What Parents say about Good Enough Parenting:

  • “Splendid training. I’m able to figure out the abnormalities in my parenting. Apart from parenting, I did learn the importance of marriage relationship and the quality of bonding or connection. Key Takeaways: Connection, Perseverance, Tone & Words, Vortex, Exasperation Interactions, Nurturing Interactions, and Schemas. No words to express my thanks but all I can say is you made an impact in my life now and this will continue forever.”
  • “I am reminded that I should notice my child’s strengths and train them accordingly rather than have unreasonable expectations.”
  • “I need to be willing to apologise and forgive. Letting go of negative feelings is important.”
  • “The importance of healthy autonomy in developing life skills. Reasonable limits for setting clear boundaries managing expectations and avoiding conflict vortex.”
  • “It is important to listen to my children and have one-to-one play time!”
  • “Expectations of parents should be realistic and have reasonable limits. A good community helps in healthy development of a child.”
  • “Praise their efforts rather than their results. Connection is essential.”
  • “Setting reasonable limits. Healthy Autonomy helps children in decision making and problem solving. Praising the effort and not the result- processing the right way of praising my children.”
  • “I have learnt to validate my children’s feelings and emotions when they share their thoughts. I have also learnt to differentiate between bad behaviour from an emotional outburst and recognise that I must connect with them to understand them.”
  • “Importance of community in helping to bring up children and impart the right values. Exiting the vortex of negativity by being vulnerable – showing empathy and being willing to reflect and apologise.”
  • “Connecting with my children is not just about empathising their feelings but also continually enforcing discipline and rules.”
  • “Awareness is power.”
  • “I must meet the core emotional needs of each child and spend more quality one-to-one time with each of my children.”

 

What Clinicians Say about Good Enough Parenting:

  • “The Good Enough Parenting model is evidence-informed and there are many good and practical handles that can guide both parents as well as professionals in the children, youth and family sector. Placing the parent-child at the center of the model is unique and Dr. John and his team’s extensive research, collection of case studies is outstanding. Looking forward to the further validation of the constructs and other research studies to further enhance this especially in the area of therapy.” – Yeo Bee Lian, Division Head from Trybe – Community & Youth Services
  • It was great as I could relate the principles to my own life – my own lifetraps. I have always known intuitively that the parent-child relationship is crucial, and am very glad that now there’s research and some structure to this intuition. I enjoyed John and Karen’s candor, their vulnerable sharing and passion for this subject as well as the warmth they show to all participants.” – Bernadette Chan, Educational Psychologist from SG Enable Ltd
  • This course has helped me to reflect on who I am and therefore, what kind of parent I am. Through an increased awareness of EIs and NIs and their potential impact, I can be more mindful. With sufficient practice, I can be a better parent, thank you!” – Geetha Shantha Ram, Director, Dyslexia Association Singapore
  • The framework is useful as a tool for me to reflect on my own parenting patterns. To reduce the negative inpacts and increase the positive impacts.” – Nor Ashraf B Samsudin, Director of Specialised Educational Services, Dyslexia Association Singapore
  • Definitely invaluable learning that can apply to self and work. I can spot Exasperation Interactions between parent / child in my line of work” – Andy Lum, Psychologist, APSN Chaoyang School
  • “My 4 learning points from GEP are: 1) The importance of meeting the core emotional needs of children and their impact on the future parent-child relationship./marriage/social life. 2) Self-awareness of why we do what we do. 3) Coping styles and its impact on relationships. 4) Identify one’s EIs or NIs or their impact on me; what makes me…. me.” – Sukvir Kaur, Principal Counsellor, THK Centre for Family Harmony @ Commonwealth
  • “As a professional, I was aware of the concepts in a broad manner. The programme training has helped me crystallize them and there is much better clarity now. It is very helpful and adds more value to my work with parents. It also reinforces and reiterates the need to be more conscious about my parenting practices.” – Madhura Agashe, Counsellor, Wings Counselling Centre
  • I utilize Theraplay in my work with families: a parent-child therapy that aims at restoring the emotional attachment bond between parents and child. The GEP principles fit in perfectly. Through understanding the Nurturing Interactions and Exasperation Interactions I could help parents understand the dynamics and what is going on when they relate with their child. Perhaps utilizing the movies as well as it might be less threatening if parents are those with counter-attacking coping styles.” – Jenny Ong Siew Lan, Trainer & Counsellor, St. Andrew’s Lifestreams
  • Indeed an excellent course that intrigued me even when I saw the brochure. A timely course that addressed my concerns on systemic issues that was affecting families and taught me how to address it effectively. Its fundamental principle of the family being the nucleus and parents being the conduit and catalyst of change is a strong message. Along with the imperative to address active negative schemas in one’s own life and getting to the “root” of the matter are “wow” moments during the course. Especially love the Repair & Reconnect part which helps me as a mother in my journey with my children and this is something I would love to share to my colleagues.” – Annu Ratha, Counsellor, Ministry of Education
  • “1) To show clients their positive schemas aside from the negative ones. 2) Potentially try to get parents involved in the therapy.” – Ting Mei Lin, Counsellor, Light Counselling Clinic
  • “Good Enough Parenting has definitely created more awareness for me in relation to both my parenting as well as professional development skills. With the insight and awareness, I hope to better my relationship with my children. Professionally, am glad I have another evidence-based parenting strategy to share with my clients, to facilitate the problem-solving process.” – Geraldine A N Yang Peterson, Principal Counselling Psychologist
  • “I think Good Enough Parenting is extremely helpful as it provides practical steps that can be used immediately with my own parenting and work with others. I like the addition and focus on Nurturing Interactions as it provides a balance to the Exasperation Interactions. Previously Good Enough Parenting was focused on Exasperation Interactions but now give good alternatives on Nurturing Interactions. Good Enough Parenting is not influenced by culture but possess principles and a framework that extends beyond culture.” – Bart Daniel, Director of International Operations, HOPE worldwide Ltd
  • “I have 4 main takeaways from GEP: 1) We often forget the importance of building a strong and healthy relationship with the other individual. We think using strategies (e.g., rewards, punishments) to motivate the child to change will be sufficient. 2) Although children have their individual differences, they all have the same fundamental core emotional needs. 3) Parenting is never easy and you have to keep putting in your effort in your child just like how you put in effort in other aspects of your life. 4) It’s never too late to rebuild the relationship but you have to put in effort to do it the helpful way.” – Liew Shi Hui, Psychologist, AMKFSC Community Services Ltd
  • This programme has very much been my missing link in helping parents with special needs, especially for parents who have taken behaviour modification as a ‘punitive’ measure. I would like to use GEP principles to help parents understand the significance of building healthy relationships with their children first as this is more important and acts as a basis for future behavioral changes.” – Eulisia Er Si Yi, Psychologist, Metta School